It Looks Good on You, Mr. President

I’m no fashion expert but I believe President Barack Obama looks better wearing two coats of shellac.  After the 2010 election when Republicans took over the House and made considerable gains in the Senate, you may recall the President saying, “We got a shellacking.”  Four years later this shellacking makes the first look like mere fingernail polish.

It’s a sad reality that the Democrat Party has come under the control of those who advocate abortion-on-demand.  As a result, these Republican victories reflect a huge opportunity to advance protective legislation for preborn children and their moms.

mom-baby1The well-known outcomes of Tuesday’s election resulted in Republicans expanding their numbers in the House of Representatives and taking over the Senate.  Numerous Republican candidates or incumbent governors won their races.  And it’s been reported that they control at least 66 of 99 state legislative chambers nationwide.  But unless you’re a political junkie like me you’ve likely missed some of the “jewels” hidden in this year’s drumming of the Democratic Party.  So let me share some of the lesser-known highlights.

Abortion has in the past—and is currently—a good issue for candidates to run on, provided they stand for life.  In two races where abortion was front and center, both pro-abortion candidates went down in flames.  State Senator Wendy Davis, aka Abortion Barbie, lost her bid for governor in Texas.  The icing on the cake was ridding the Texas Senate of the tennis shoe-clad pro-abortion activist, and electing pro-life candidate Konni Burton to fill her vacated seat.  Sandra Fluke whose claim to fame was verbally sparing with Rush Limbaugh over abortion and birth control, was also defeated in her quest for a State Senate seat in California.

Referendums on the abortion issue resulted in good and bad news.  Tennessee successfully passed an amendment to their constitution that now allows the state legislature to pass protective measures for unborn babies and their mothers.  Two personhood-like issues in Colorado and North Dakota went down to defeat.  The personhood approach is historically noted for coming up short with voters.

2014-election-winnersThe Democrat’s fabricated “war on women” suffered a serious and possibly fatal blow on Tuesday.  A perfect example is the Senate race in Colorado.  Pro-abortion incumbent Mark Udall (D) obsessed on the issue of abortion so much that the media dubbed him “Senator Uterus.”  He lost to pro-life Cory Gardner (R).

GOP women were in the spotlight with notable firsts: pro-life Mia Love won in Utah, making her the first Black female from her party elected to Congress.  Joni Ernst, an enthusiastic pro-lifer, is the first-ever female combat veteran and the first elected woman Senator from Iowa. And 30-year-old Elise Stefanik’s victory in New York’s Twenty-First District made her the youngest woman ever elected to Congress.

It was not a good night for generational candidates related to past famous or well-known elected officials.  Jason Carter (D), grandson to President Jimmy Carter, lost his bid for governor in Georgia.  Unsuccessful Senate incumbent Mark Udall (D) of Colorado is the son of Mo Udall, 30-year congressman from Arizona.  Michelle Nunn (D) who lost her bid to win the open Senate seat in Georgia is the daughter of Sam Nunn, a 24-year Senator from the same state.  Senator Mark Pryor (D) of Arkansas, son of former governor and US Senator David Pryor was defeated in his reelection bid.

Senator Mary Landrieu of Louisiana (D), daughter of Moon Landrieu, former mayor of New Orleans, and sister of Mitch Landrieu, current mayor and former lieutenant governor, is likely to lose her reelection bid to Bill Cassidy (R) in an early December runoff.  A loss is also expected for Alaska’s Senator Mark Begich (D), who is the son of former congressman Nick Begich, also from Alaska.

The only heir to a political family who won an election was George P. Bush (R), the son of former Florida governor and potential 2016 Presidential candidate Jeb Bush and nephew of former President George W. Bush.  The young upstart won a post on the Texas Land Commission in a landslide victory.

The aftermath of this mid-term election generated a few comical moments on Twitter.  Elizabeth Plank with the ultra liberal MSNBC tweeted that “Wendy Davis took being pro-choice to the next level.  Either way she’s made history.”  To which pro-life blogger Jill Stanek responded, “So did the Titanic.”

@UnitedBlue, a far left activist group, tweeted a helpful clarification regarding why the election turned out the way it did.  “Let’s be clear: we didn’t lose the Senate because Republicans have better ideas or because they’re appealing to more voters.”  Yes, they actually wrote that.  Dan McConchie with Americans United for Life could have correctly responded that that’s exactly why Republicans got the Senate, but instead offered something closer to their intellectual level.  Dan wrote, “Because they’re better looking?”

Tuesday evening on Fox News, Senator Ted Cruz, (R) Texas, said “Now that we have won the election, it is incumbent on Republicans to stand up and lead. … Americans don’t necessarily trust Republicans; they’ve given us another chance.”  His analysis of the American voter couldn’t have been more accurate.  Republicans have a golden opportunity to redeem themselves by doing the will of the people.  The nation’s voters sent a clear message to Congress and the President—get rid of Obamacare, stop usurping our liberties and pass protective legislation for unborn babies and their mothers.

I hope and pray that they’ll respond accordingly and effectively.

Bradley Mattes
President, Life Issues Institute

Life Issues Institute is dedicated to changing hearts and minds of millions of people through education. For 27 years, organizations and individuals around the world have depended upon Life Issues Institute to provide the latest information and effective tools to protect innocent human life from womb to tomb.

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