Taking the Pro-Life Message to Budapest

I recently returned from a trip to Budapest, Hungary, a beautiful city with old European architecture lining the Danube River, as well as the narrow cobblestone streets. The beautiful, gothic Parliament building sits, in stately form, on the riverbank and is reminiscent of London’’s parliament building on the River Thames.

The main purpose of my travel was to speak at a Christian medical conference. The audience consisted of mostly physicians, with nurses, psychologists, professors, theologians and some laymen. I gave a keynote presentation on the issues of RU 486, stem cells, statistics and why we’re optimistic in the US about ending abortion.

The next day I spoke on the issues of men and abortion and the link between abortion and breast cancer. Response was very positive. The conference participants were eager sponges, wanting to learn everything they could about the life issues.

My base of operations was a crisis pregnancy center in the heart of Budapest. This afforded me the opportunity to counsel a post-abortive father, with two abortions in his past. At first, he was almost smug in his attitude, saying the abortions didn’’t bother him.

Then he saw our 8-week baby flyer with a picture and text explaining the milestones of development at this stage of pregnancy. His mouth dropped open and his demeanor immediately changed. He asked how big the child was. We had a graphic to show him the exact size. One way or another, life had changed for this man. Another opportunity came when I was able to do abstinence counseling with a 21-year-old man. He left the center, rededicated to an abstinent lifestyle.

I was also interviewed on a variety of life-issue topics for broadcast on the PAX TV network, which airs throughout the country. As a result, I am forwarding pro-life videos from several organizations that will be translated and adapted for Hungary’’s television viewers. It was a very productive trip, which should bear life-saving fruit for Hungary’’s unborn children.

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